2020 Reading Challenges

It's that time of year again! Time to choose my annual reading challenges ... oooh, such fun! I've chosen lots of old favorites, plus some new ones:

Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2020 hosted by My Reader's Block

Last year, I read a whopping 45 books from my own shelves! But somehow, they are still piling up, so I'm going to attempt that again, shooting for Mt. Ararat at 48 books from my TBR shelves.

I have an entire TBR bookcase (that now has double rows on every shelf!), so I really need this challenge every year. Note that the host says its OK to count e-books and audio books, but I usually count only print books, as those are the ones physically piling up.

There are monthly summary link-ups (I will try to remember this year).
  1. Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday
  2. Recursion by Blake Crouch 
  3. Hum If You Don't Know the Words by Bianca Marais
  4. Saturday by Ian McEwan 
  5. OCD Love Story by Corey Ann Haydu
  6. For Once in My Life by Colleen Coleman  
  7. Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut  
  8. Snapdragon by Kat Leyh
  9. The Late Show by Michael Connelly
  10. Go To Sleep (I Miss You) by Lucy Knisley
  11. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer
  12. Go with the Flow by Lily Williams and Karen Schneemann
  13. The Phantom Twin by Lisa Brown
  14. How to Write Nonfiction by Joanna Penn 
  15. Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett 
  16. The Last One by Alexandra Oliva
  17. Out of Reach by Carrie Arcos  
  18. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  19. The Way to Stay in Destiny by Augusta Scattergood 
  20. Faithful Place by Tana French
  21. Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty  
  22. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  23. Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King
  24. Doomsday Book by Connie Willis 
  25. Normal People by Sally Rooney


2020 Monthly Motif Reading Challenge hosted by Girlxoxo.

I enjoy this challenge every year! I only missed one monthly motif last year, so I will try to hit them all in 2020! This also has monthly review link-ups.

This year's motifs are:

JANUARY-  Winter Wonderland
Focusing on ‘wonderland’, read a book set in a truly wonderful place- somewhere you’ve always thought was beautiful, somewhere with a wonderfully rich culture, a snowy setting, or maybe even a magical realm. It’s your interpretation, so have fun with it. Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk

FEBRUARY- Seeing Red
Read a book with the word ‘red’ in the title OR a book with a red-ish cover. Bonus if it has both. Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess

MARCH- Sub-Genre Sound Off
Choose a sub-genre of your favorite genre and read a book from it. Make sure you mention the sub genre you chose in your review. (Ex. Sub Genres of Fantasy could be Magical Realism, Fairytale Retellings, or Epic Fantasy to name just a few.) The Atomic City Girls by Janet Beard (historical fiction - WWII)

APRIL- Classics or Currents
Read a book published before the year you were born (classic-ish) OR a book published between April 2019 and April 2020 (current.) Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore (published in 2020)

MAY- Author Introduction
Read a book written by an author who you’ve never read anything by. Bonus if its been on your TBR for more than a year. Out of Reach by Carrie Arcos (and on my TBR shelves for 8 years!!)

JUNE- Name or Number
Read a book in which a name OR a number is part of the title. Bonus if the title includes both a name and a number. Vera Kelly Is Not a Mystery by Rosalie Knecht AND Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

JULY- Around or Out of this World 
Read a book set in a country other than the one you live in OR written by an author who is from a country other than your own OR read a book that takes place in space or on another planet. Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata was set in Japan and written by a Japanese author.

AUGUST- Creature Feature
Read a book that includes a creature of some kind on the cover or in the story. Cat, dog, dragon, werewolf – mythical or real – find a book that features a creature.

SEPTEMBER- When Text Just Isn’t Enough
Read a book that includes more than just text. Maybe it’s a map, a family tree, illustrations, documents like emails or letters- something else that helps to paint the picture.

OCTOBER- Thrills and Chills
Ghost stories, haunted houses, true crime, murder mysteries, a thriller keeping you on the edge of your seat- it’s up to you!

NOVEMBER- Dynamic Duos
Read a book with a couple of characters that make the perfect pair whether in business or in love. (Ex. Sherlock & Holmes, Elizabeth & Darcy)

DECEMBER- Sugar, Spice, Everything Nice
Holiday or winter themed reads, love stories and romances, happy cries, comedies; round out your year with a truly feel good read.


Back to the Classics hosted by Books and Chocolate.

Another one I am returning to this year. For the last three years, I aimed to read 6 classics and managed just 5 (and only 4 last year!), so I am once again setting my goal at 6 classics. I'm going to do it this year!! Here are the categories:

THE CATEGORIES: 


1. 19th Century Classic. Any classic book originally published between 1800 and 1899.



2. 20th Century Classic. Any classic book originally published between 1900 and 1970. All books in this category must have been published at least 50 years ago. The only exceptions are books that were published posthumously but were written at least 50 years ago. 



3. Classic by a Woman Author.




4. Classic in Translation. Any classic originally written in a novel other than your native language. You may read the book in your native language, or its original language (or a third language for all you polyglots). Modern translations are acceptable, as long as the book was originally published at least 50 years ago. Books in translation are acceptable in all other categories as well.




5. Classic by a Person of Color. Any classic work by a non-white author. 



6. A Genre Classic. Any classic novel that falls into a genre category -- fantasy, science fiction, Western, romance, crime, horror, etc.  Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut



7. Classic with a Person's Name in the Title. First name, last name or both. Examples include Ethan Frome; Emma; Madam Bovary; Anna Karenina; Daniel Deronda; David Copperfield, etc. 



8. Classic with a Place in the Title. Any classic with the proper name of a place (real or fictional) - a country, region, city, town, village, street, building, etc. Examples include Notre Dame de Paris; Mansfield Park; East of Eden; The Canterbury Tales; Death on the Nile; etc.



9. Classic with Nature in the Title. A classic with any element of nature in the title (not including animals). Examples include The Magic Mountain; The Grapes of Wrath; The Jungle; A High Wind in Jamaica; Gone With the Wind; Under the Volcano; etc.
The Call of the Wild by Jack London



10. Classic About a Family. This classic should have multiple members of the same family as principal characters, either from the same generation or multiple different generations.  Updated: Family members in the title are also acceptable.Examples include Sense and Sensibility; Wives and Daughters; The Brothers Karamazov; Fathers and Sons; The Good Earth; Howards End; and The Makioka Sisters.


11. Abandoned Classic. Choose a classic that you started and just never got around to finishing, whether you didn't like it at or just didn't get around to it. Now is the time to give it another try.
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller



12. Classic Adaptation. Any classic that's been adapted as a movie or TV series. If you like, you can watch the adaptation and include your thoughts in your book review. It's not required but it's always fun to compare.






I was looking for a pure fun reading challenge (and totally bombed at the Monthly Keywords Challenge I tried last year). I saw this one at Helen's Book Blog, and it sounds like just what I was looking for! There don't seem to be any sign-ups, just a printable checklist of a wide range of 50 different categories and lots of ways to connect via social media. So, I'm in!

Rather than retyping all 50 categories here, I will just list the ones I check off each month.

  1. Book recommended by favorite podcast: Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
  2. Book that passes the Bechdel test: Running on Red Dog Road by Drema Hall Berkheimer
  3. Book with the same title as a movie but unrelated: Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday
  4. Book I meant to read in 2019: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
  5. Medical thriller: Recursion by Blake Crouch
  6. Book with a main character in her 20's: Things You Save in a Fire by Katherine Center 
  7. A book set in a city that has hosted the Olympics: Saturday by Ian McEwan
  8. A book with a map: An Indigenous People's History of the Unites States for Young People by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz 
  9. A book about a woman in STEM: State of Wonder by Anne Patchett (pharmaceutical research)
  10. A book with a bird on the cover: Hum If You Don't Know the Words by Bianca Marais
  11. Your favorite prompt from a past Popsugar Challenge (2019) - A book I meant to read in 2018: Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess 
  12. A book that won an award in 2019: Black Is the Body: Stories from my Grandmother's Time, my Mother's Time, and Mine by Emily Bernard
  13. A book on a subject you know nothing about: The Atomic City Girls by Janet Beard
  14. A book that has a book on the cover: The Lost Book of Adana Moreau by Michael Zapata
  15. A book with a three-word title: Women Rowing North by Mary Pipher
  16. A book with a pink cover: OCD Love Story by Corey Ann Haydu
  17. A book by or about a journalist: For Once in My Life by Colleen Coleman
  18.  A book published in 2020: Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore 
  19. A book with a pun in the title: Go with the Flow by Lily Williams and Karen Schneemann
  20. A book with at least a four-star rating on Goodreads: Snapdragon by Kat Leyh
  21.  A book set in a country beginning with "C" - Notorious by Gordon Korman (Canada)
  22. A book with a character with vision impairment or enhancement: Go To Sleep (I Miss You) by Lucy Knisley
  23. A book set in the 1920's: The Phantom Twin by Lisa Brown
  24. A book by an author who has written more than 20 books: The Late Show by Michael Connelly
  25. A book with more than 20 letters in its title: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer  
  26. A book published in the 20th century: Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut 
  27. The first book you touch on a shelf with your eyes closed - Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett  
  28. A book featuring one of the deadly sins - Bent Heavens by Daniel Krauss (wrath)
  29. A book by a WOC -  Lakewood by Megan Giddings
  30. A book published the month of your birthday (July) - The Last One by Alexandra Oliva  
  31. A book with a great first line - Out of Reach by Carrie Arcos
  32.  A book written by an author in their 20's - Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert (only 23 years old!)
  33. A book set in Japan: Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata



2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge hosted by Book'd Out.

I always sign up for a nonfiction challenge. This is a different one than last year but hosted by a favorite blogger, so I am looking forward to it! Last year, I read 14 nonfiction books, so I will sign up for the Nonfiction Know-It-all category and shoot for reading at least 12.

As an extra challenge, she has different categories:

1. Memoir Running on Red Dog Road by Drema Hall Berkheimer
2. Disaster Event
3. Social Science Black Is the Body: Stories from my Grandmother's Time, my Mother's Time, and Mine by Emily Bernard
4. Related to an Occupation - How to Write Nonfiction by Joanna Penn
5. History An Indigenous People's History of the Unites States for Young People by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
6. Feminism Women Rowing North: Navigating Life's Currents and Flourishing as We Age by Mary Pipher
7. Psychology
8. Medical Issue
9. Nature
10. True Crime
11. Science
12. Published in 2020 Go To Sleep (I Miss You) by Lucy Knisley

Travel: Greek to Me by Mary Norris


2020 Diversity Reading Challenge hosted by Celebrity Readers.

This is also a familiar challenge for me but hosted by a different blog this year. Since I read 37 diverse books last year, I will shoot for 40 this year! This challenge includes optional monthly themes:
  1. Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday
  2. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
  3. Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk 
  4. State of Wonder by Anne Patchett
  5. An Indigenous People's History of the Unites States for Young People by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
  6. Hum If You Don't Know the Words by Bianca Marais
  7. Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess 
  8. The Atomic City Girls by Janet Beard  
  9. Who Is Vera Kelly? by Rosalie Knecht
  10. Black Is the Body: Stories from my Grandmother's Time, my Mother's Time, and Mine by Emily Bernard  
  11. OCD Love Story by Corey Ann Haydu
  12. The Lost Book of Adana Moreau by Michael Zapata
  13. Women Rowing North: Navigating Life's Currents and Flourishing as We Age by Mary Pipher 
  14. Snapdragon by Kat Leyh
  15. The Late Show by Michael Connelly
  16. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer  
  17. Go with the Flow by Lily Williams and Karen Schneemann
  18. The Phantom Twin by Lisa Brown 
  19. Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett  
  20. Lakewood by Megan Giddings
  21. The Way to Stay in Destiny by Augusta Scattergood 
  22. Vera Kelly Is Not a Mystery by Rosalie Knecht 
  23. Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King
  24. Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert
  25. Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata 
  26. American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins


JANUARY – diverse folktales/culture/mythology; or diverse retelling; or non-western setting
Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk
FEBRUARYpoc: Black/African American Hum If You Don't Know the Words by Bianca Marais AND Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess
MARCH#ownvoices; or gender: female authors in male-dominated genres/non-fiction Women Rowing North: Navigating Life's Currents and Flourishing as We Age by Mary Pipher
APRIL – poc: Middle Eastern/South Asian
MAYpoc: East Asian/Southeast Asian/Pacific Islander
JUNELGBT+ pride summer: sexuality and gender identity Vera Kelly Is Not a Mystery by Rosalie Knecht
JULY – LGBT+ pride summer: sexuality and gender identity
AUGUSTmental health/addiction
SEPTEMBERpoc: hispanic/latinx 
OCTOBERphysical/sensory/cognitive/intellectual/developmental disabilities 
NOVEMBERpoc: Native American 
DECEMBERreligious minorities



Travel the World in Books Reading Challenge hosted by Mom's Small Victories, one of my favorite blogs. I signed up for this one back in 2014, so this is a continuation (it's a perpetual challenge) - I can't wait to see what places I visit in books in 2020. In 2018, I read 31 books set in other countries/cultures (30 different countries/regions - I read a trip-around-the-world memoir at the end of the year!), and in 2019, I read 23 books set in 18 different countries. I hope to visit more new-to-me places in 2020!
  1. Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday (Iraq)
  2. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (Sweden)
  3. Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk (Poland) 
  4. State of Wonder by Anne Patchett  (Brazil)
  5. Hum If You Don't Know the Words by Bianca Marais (South Africa)
  6. Saturday by Ian McEwan (UK)
  7. Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess (Ghana)
  8. Who Is Vera Kelly? by Rosalie Knecht (Argentina)
  9. For Once in My Life by Colleen Coleman  (UK)
  10. Notorious by Gordon Korman (Canada)
  11. Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut (Germany)
  12. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer  (Germany)
  13. Greek to Me by Mary Norris (Greece)
  14. The Call of the Wild by Jack London (Canada) 
  15. Faithful Place by Tana French (Ireland)
  16. Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty  (Australia)
  17. Vera Kelly Is Not a Mystery by Rosalie Knecht (Dominican Republic)
  18. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (Italy)
  19. Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert (UK)  
  20. Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata (Japan)
  21. Doomsday Book by Connie Willis (UK) 
  22. Normal People by Sally Rooney (Ireland)
  23. American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins (Mexico)



2020 Literary Escapes Challenge hosted by Escape with Dollycas Into a Good Book.

I love tracking where I read domestically, as well. In 2018, I read books set in 25 different states for this challenge, and in 2019, I read books set in 28 different states. I'm looking forward to reading in even more states this year!

Alabama
Alaska The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Arizona
Arkansas
California Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess, The Late Show by Michael Connelly, Out of Reach by Carrie Arcos, A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida The Way to Stay in Destiny by Augusta Scattergood
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa Bent Heavens by Daniel Krauss
Kansas Women Rowing North: Navigating Life's Currents and Flourishing as We Age by Mary Pipher
Kentucky
Louisiana The Lost Book of Adana Moreau by Michael Zapata
Maine Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett Haydu
Maryland
Massachusetts Things You Save in a Fire by Katherine Center, OCD Love Story by Corey Ann,
Michigan Notorious by Gordon Korman, Lakewood by Megan Giddings
Minnesota State of Wonder by Anne Patchett
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday, Recursion by Blake Crouch, Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania The Last One by Alexandra Oliva, The Dutch House by Ann Patchett
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee The Atomic City Girls by Janet Beard
Texas
Utah
Vermont Black Is the Body: Stories from my Grandmother's Time, my Mother's Time, and Mine by Emily Bernard
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia Running on Red Dog Road by Drema Hall Berkheimer
Wisconsin
Wyoming


Bookish Bingo hosted by Chapter Break - not really a challenge per se, but a fun game that I play each month! Stop by to print out this month's Bingo card and play along!



Big Book Summer Challenge hosted by Book By Book (me!)
  1. Faithful Place by Tana French
  2. A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen
  3. Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty  
  4. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  5. The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins
  6. Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King
  7. Doomsday Book by Connie Willis 
  8. American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins

Starting at the end of May. I usually aim to read 6 Big Books (400+ pages) during the summer for the challenge. All are welcome to join the fun! I'll post the sign-up page at the end of May.

4 comments:

  1. Fabulous challenges! I am also doing PopSugar, Mount TBR, Literary Escapes, and your Big Book challenge!

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    1. Yay! Glad you'll be joining Big Book Summer again, Helen - you were my inspiration for joining Popsugar!

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  2. Good luck. I might join the Big Books Summer Challenge this year as well. Other than that, I do the Historical Fiction one, the new releases one, and this year I'm also doing the #printonly2020 reading challenge and the #fortheloveofebooks20 reading challenge.

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    Replies
    1. Great, Davida! I hope you do join again. You're doing some I hadn't heard of yet - sounds like a great reading year in store for you!

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